Occasionally, I'll hear the question, "do you prefer Lightroom or Photoshop". But there's so much to be said to just simply tell someone in detail why I prefer which. So, I wanted to make a blog post to go into detail about why I prefer Lightroom.

The preference between Lightroom and Photoshop stems from what kind of editor you are; even what kind of photographer you are at times. I am not a heavy editor. This means that I don't distort my models to be what they're not and I don't add, take away, lengthen, volumize features on body to make them more presentable. However, I will adjust blemishes and eye color on occasion, but not always. Fashion photography is my passion, but if my client wants all of those things to be done, I'm not your girl. In my editing techniques, I lighten, darken, enhance, clarify, and alter color. Lightroom can certainly do all of these things for me.

Let's begin with one of my favorite features in Lightroom and that's the ability to edit specific sections of an image by using a tool that looks very similar to a clone stamp. Because of this feature, I could go in an intricately darken certain portions of this image to make sure that the darkness was even throughout the image.

{Adjustment Brush - Darken} Lightroom 4

{Adjustment Brush - Darken} Lightroom 4

Next, I would like to show how Lightroom can enhance beauty shots. Photoshop is an excellent program for cloning and healing. It's very seldom that I use Photoshop to do those things unless the situation is really bad and Lightroom just isn't working for me. But it normally does the trick. Below is an image that required cloning and healing to purposefully make my model seem luminescent for a series that I worked on last year. I didn't want her to look like a doll, but I wanted to get the point across. I edited it enough to where she glows and appears flawless in an innocent way, yet without making her look like a doll, there's a strong, independent woman that still shines through.

{Wild Rose series - Cloning/Healing} Lightroom 4

{Wild Rose series - Cloning/Healing} Lightroom 4

Now, I want to show an image where there was a lot of editing to be done for a client. We were given a small set up to work with in a small room. We shot the models of white seamless paper and had to create a hard platform for the models to walk on so their heels wouldn't pierce through the paper. WIth shooting about 20 models a week on this set up, you could imagine that things would start to get damaged and dirty. In addition to that, there were instances where the models would model is ways that would go beyond the space that we had. Long story short, there was a lot more post-editing that needed to be done at times. When first looking at the image, some may say, "this is a job for Photoshop". Well, I knew that Lightroom could fix my issues and it did. With using the cloning/healing tool and the adjustment brush, I was able to fix, modify, and enhance the background and make the model stand out as she should. 

(Client Work - Cloning/Healing} Lightroom 4

(Client Work - Cloning/Healing} Lightroom 4

Lastly, I just wanted to show the easy accessibility to exporting files in a specific manor that Lightroom has to offer. Often times, clients ask for specific files when they want their images. For example, your RAW files may be set to 240 or 300 DPI, 11 x 17 (roughly), and a 5MB file. So, when you save that file as a JPEG, it's going to save with the same settings. In Photoshop, there are ways you can save images in a smaller format for the web, but you lose quality in the image that way. Another way is if you want to resize the image in Photoshop, you simply do so while editing. What Lightroom provides is a way to keep your original settings and the ability to export the image multiple times with multiple settings. So, you're saving your RAW files and the client wants the image to be 300 DPI, longest edge to be 10 inches, and the file to be no bigger than 3MB. When you export, you'll see these sections in the image below and you can change all of those settings, hit export, then change them again, and export again; and so on and so forth. All of this without altering the original settings of your image. Plus, Lightroom keeps all of the images you import in the program and stores them for you. It also enables you to specify what metadata you want to be exported with your image and add your watermark; all in the same spot.

exporting.png

This was long, yes. But there's so much more to Lightroom than what I've mentioned. Surprisingly, this was the brief version. So, these are the major reasons why I love Lightroom and why I choose it over Photoshop. Another reason is the ability to save editing presets, but I'll save that for another day. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask!

Thank you for reading! :)

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